“It’s like spreading a dollop of sunshine on the morning toast” — Jonathan Edgerton, this week’s guest chef who will be teaching us how to make and can an orange marmalade to brighten up your palate and the winter season. Jonathan and his wife Stacy run The Gentleman Farmer in Maine, an Instagram account where they tackle new projects and explores different cultures out of their home, Mossy Ledge Farm in Bowdoin, Maine. Join Jonathan on Thursday, March 4 at 5pm on Facebook Live as he adds some vibrant citrus into our kitchen!

Ingredients: 

8 blood oranges  

2 lemons  

4 pounds granulated sugar    

1 packet fruit pectin  

1/2 gallon water  

Other things you’ll need:  

Juicer  

Strainer  

15-inch square of cheesecloth or muslin, with string for tying  

About ten 8 ounce jelly jars  

Two large pots – one for boiling the peel and one for sterilizing/canning 

Blood Orange Marmalade

Directions:  

Start by cutting the blood oranges into two halves crosswise. 

Using a juicer, extract as much of the juice as possible, strain it to remove seeds, and  set aside. 

Use a sharp spoon to scrape any membrane and some of the pith from the peels – I  find that cutting the a peels into quarters works best for this.  

Place the membranes, pith, seeds, etc. in the center of the cheesecloth, fold up the  edges and tie it closed (essentially you’re creating a big “tea bag” so you can extract  the flavor and pectin from these materials). 

Slice the peel into narrow strips, between 1/8 and 1/4 inch wide. 

Place the sliced peel, the cheesecloth bundle containing the membrane and pith, and  1/2 gallon of water in a large pot and bring to a boil. Simmer uncovered for 2 hours. 

Remove the cheesecloth bundle and discard. 

Add the pectin, stirring constantly. 

Add the 4 pounds of sugar, stirring constantly. 

Bring to a full rolling boil and keep it boiling, stirring intermittently, for 25 minutes.  

In a separate pot, gently boil the jars and covers for at least two minutes. Drain and set  aside on a clean cloth. Note that the hot water bath should be deep enough to cover  the upright jars by an inch or so.  

When the fruit, sugar and pectin has boiled for 25 minutes remove it from the heat.  

Using a sterilized ladle, carefully spoon the hot marmalade into each of the jars. Take  care that the peel is evenly distributed amongst the jars.  

Wipe the rims of the jars with a clean, damp cloth and put on the lids, tightening gently. Place them carefully in the hot water bath and simmer for 5 to 7 minutes.  

Carefully remove the jars from the hot water bath, tighten the covers and allow them to  cool. It’s often a good idea to invert the jars for a few minutes as they cool to evenly  distribute the peel (otherwise it tends to float to the top).